Cobb County World Language Programs

Teacher Quick Links

Programs by Language 

Click HERE to access the list individual language programs as well as specific language program information.

Language Programs by Level

Bilingual and Specialized Programs

The programs below are exclusive to each school. Click over each item to find additional information.

Seals

Cobb County School District the following Georgia Department of Education World Language Seals:

Georgia Seal
of Biliteracy
International Skills
Diploma Seal

  

* Not all programs are available at all schools, please check with your local school for details.

** The selection of target language on Dual Language Immersion programs is a local school decision based on community input.

Click on the images below to learn more about language expectations and download the domain or level specific Student Self-Assessment Checklists documents.

 Performace
Description
 Domain  Level
 CCSD WL Speaking  CCSD WL Modes Interpersonal WL Proficiency IM 

   

INTERMEDIATE MID:

 I can participate in conversations on familiar topics using sentences and series of sentences. I can handle short social interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions. I can usually say what I want to say about myself and my

I can start, maintain, and end a conversation on a variety of familiar topics.

·  I can be the first to start a conversation.

·  I can ask for information, details, and explanations during a conversation.

·  I can bring a conversation to a close.

·  I can interview someone for a project or a publication.

I can talk about my daily activities and personal preferences.

·  I can talk about my daily routine.

·  I can talk about my interests and hobbies.

·  I can give reasons for my preferences.

·  I can give some information about activities I did.

·  I can give some information about something I plan to do.

·  I can talk about my favorite music, movies, and sports.

I can use my language to handle tasks related to my personal needs.

·  I can request services, such as repair for a phone, computer, or car.

·  I can schedule an appointment.

·  I can inquire about membership in an organization or club.

I can exchange information about subjects of special interest to me.

·  I can talk about artists from other countries.

·  I can talk about historical events.

·  I can talk about a mathematics, technology, or science project.

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Click on the images below to learn more about language expectations and download the domain or level specific Student Self-Assessment Checklists documents.

 Performace
Description
 Domain  Level
 CCSD WL Speaking  CCSD WL Modes Interpersonal WL Proficiency IH 

 

INTERMEDIATE HIGH:

 I can participate with ease and confidence in conversations on familiar topics. I can usually talk about events and experiences in various time frames. I can usually describe people, places, and things. I can handle social interactions in everyday situations, sometimes even when there is an unexpected complication.

I can exchange information related to areas of mutual interest.

·  I can ask for and provide information about specific events.

·  I can ask for and provide information about a hobby or lifestyle, such as bicycling, vegetarianism, video games, or sports.

·  I can ask for and provide descriptions of places I know and also places I would like to visit.

·  I can talk about my family history.

·  I can talk about jobs and career plans.

 I can use my language to do a task that requires multiple steps.

·  I can give the basic rules of a game or sport and answer questions about them.

·  I can ask for, follow, and give instructions for preparing food.

·  I can ask for and follow directions to get from one place to another.

·  I can tell someone how to access information online.

·  I can explain basic rules, policies, or laws that affect us and answer questions about them.

 I can use my language to handle a situation that may have a complication.

·  I can arrange for a make-up exam or reschedule an appointment.

·  I can return an item I have purchased to a store.

·  I can plan an outing with a group of friends.

   

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Click on the images below to learn more about language expectations and download the domain or level specific Student Self-Assessment Checklists documents.

 Performace
Description
 Domain  Level
 CCSD WL Speaking  CCSD WL Modes Interpersonal WL Proficiency AL 

 

INTERMEDIATE HIGH:

 I can participate with ease and confidence in conversations on familiar topics. I can usually talk about events and experiences in various time frames. I can usually describe people, places, and things. I can handle social interactions in everyday situations, sometimes even when there is an unexpected complication.

I can exchange information related to areas of mutual interest.

·  I can ask for and provide information about specific events.

·  I can ask for and provide information about a hobby or lifestyle, such as bicycling, vegetarianism, video games, or sports.

·  I can ask for and provide descriptions of places I know and also places I would like to visit.

·  I can talk about my family history.

·  I can talk about jobs and career plans.

 I can use my language to do a task that requires multiple steps.

·  I can give the basic rules of a game or sport and answer questions about them.

·  I can ask for, follow, and give instructions for preparing food.

·  I can ask for and follow directions to get from one place to another.

·  I can tell someone how to access information online.

·  I can explain basic rules, policies, or laws that affect us and answer questions about them.

 I can use my language to handle a situation that may have a complication.

·  I can arrange for a make-up exam or reschedule an appointment.

·  I can return an item I have purchased to a store.

·  I can plan an outing with a group of friends.

   

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The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (speaking and writing), understanding language (listening and reading), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 
Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level.

Level

WL Interpersonal
Interpersonal
Communication

WL Speaking
Presentational
Speaking

WL Writing
Presentational
Writing

WL Listening
Interpretive
Listening

WL Reading
Interpretive
 Reading

Level I

Novice
Low
Novice
Mid
Novice
Low
Novice 
Mid
Novice
Low

Level II

Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
Mid

Level III

Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
High
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
High
Novice
Mid (+)

Level IV

Novice
High
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High

Level V - VIII

Intermediate Low (-) to
Intermediate High (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
Low (-) to 
Intermediate High (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
Low (-) to 
Intermediate High (-)
Pin It

The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (speaking and writing), understanding language (listening and reading), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 
Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level.

Level

WL Interpersonal
Interpersonal
Communication

WL Speaking
Presentational
Speaking

WL Writing
Presentational
Writing

WL Listening
Interpretive
Listening

WL Reading
Interpretive
Reading

Level I

Novice
Low
Novice
Mid
Novice
Low
Novice 
Mid
Novice
Low

Level II

Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
Mid

Level III

Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
High
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
High
Novice
Mid (+)

Level IV

Novice
High
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High

Level V - VIII

Intermediate Low (-) to
Intermediate High (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
Low (-) to 
Intermediate High (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
Low (-) to 
Intermediate High (-)
Pin It

The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (speaking and writing), understanding language (listening and reading), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 
Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level.

Level

WL Interpersonal
Interpersonal
Communication

WL Speaking
Presentational
Speaking

WL Writing
Presentational
Writing

WL Listening
Interpretive 
Listening

WL Reading
Interpretive 
Reading

Level I

Novice
Low
Novice
Mid
Novice
Low
Novice 
Mid
Novice
Low

Level II

Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
Mid

Level III

Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
High
Novice
Mid (+)
Novice
High
Novice
Mid (+)

Level IV

Novice
High
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High

Level V - VIII

Intermediate Low (-) to
Intermediate High (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
Low (-) to 
Intermediate High (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
Low (-) to 
Intermediate High (-)
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The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (Expresive and Glossing), understanding language (Receptive and Finger Spelling), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 

Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level. 

Level

Interpersonal
Receptive

Presentational
Expressive

Presentational
Glossing

Interpretive

Interpretive
FingerSpelling

Level I

Novice
Mid
Novice
Mid
Novice
Low
Novice 
High
Novice
Mid

Level II

Novice
High
Novice
High
Novice
Mid
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
High

Level III

Intermediate 
Low (-)
Intermediate 
Low (-)
Novice
High
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Low (-)

Level IV

Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate
Low

Level V - VIII

Intermediate
Mid to
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
Mid to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
Mid to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
Mid to 
Advanced Low
Pin It

The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (speaking and writing), understanding language (listening and reading), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 

Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level. 

Level

WL Interpersonal

Interpersonal
Communication

WL Speaking

Presentational
Speaking

WL Writing

Presentational
Writing

WL Listening

Interpretive
Listening

WL Reading

Interpretive
Reading

Level I

Novice
Mid
Novice
High
Novice
High
Novice 
Mid
Intermediate
Low

Level II

Novice
Mid (+)
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Novice
Mid (+)
Intermediate
Mid (-)

Level III

Novice 
High
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Novice 
High
Intermediate 
Mid

Level IV

Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate
High (-)

Level V - VIII

Intermediate
Mid (-) to
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
Mid (-) to 
Intermediate High
Intermediate 
High to 
Advanced Low

Learn more about ACTFL's Language Proficiency Guidelines and the NCSSFL-ACTFL Global CAN-DO Benchmark Statements.

 

Pin It

The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (speaking and writing), understanding language (listening and reading), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 

Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level. 

Level

WL Interpersonal

Interpersonal
Communication

WL Speaking

Presentational
Speaking

WL Writing

Presentational
Writing

WL Listening

Interpretive
Listening

WL Reading

Interpretive
Reading

Level I

Novice
High
Novice
High
Novice
High
Novice 
High
Intermediate
Low

Level II

Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate
Mid (-)

Level III

Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid

Level IV

Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate
High (-)

Level V - VIII

Intermediate
High (-) to
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High to 
Advanced Low

Learn more about ACTFL's Language Proficiency Guidelines and the NCSSFL-ACTFL Global CAN-DO Benchmark Statements.

 

Pin It

The language proficiency targets indicate what students are expected to do with the language at the end of each course in terms of producing language (speaking and writing), understanding language (listening and reading), and interacting with others in the language. Proficiency targets for each language are based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. 

Click on each of the headings for details on the target skills for each level. 

Level

WL Interpersonal

Interpersonal
Communication

WL Speaking

Presentational
Speaking

WL Writing

Presentational
Writing

WL Listening

Interpretive
Listening

WL Reading

Interpretive
Reading

Level I

Novice
High
Novice
High
Novice
High
Novice 
High
Intermediate
Low

Level II

Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate 
Low
Intermediate
Mid (-)

Level III

Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid (-)
Intermediate 
Mid

Level IV

Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate 
Mid
Intermediate
High (-)

Level V - VIII

Intermediate
High (-) to
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High (-) to 
Advanced Low
Intermediate 
High to 
Advanced Low

Learn more about ACTFL's Language Proficiency Guidelines and the NCSSFL-ACTFL Global CAN-DO Benchmark Statements.

 

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At the Novice level, readers can understand key words and cognates, as well as formulaic phrases that are highly contextualized. Novice-level readers are able to get a limited amount of information from highly predictable texts in which the topic or context is very familiar, such as a hotel bill, a credit card receipt, or a weather map. Readers at the Novice level may rely heavily on their own background knowledge and extralinguistic support (such as the imagery on the weather map or the format of a credit card bill) to derive meaning. Readers at the Novice level are best able to understand a text when they are able to anticipate the information in the text. At the Novice level, recognition of key words, cognates, and formulaic phrases makes comprehension possible

Novice High

At the Novice High sublevel, readers can understand, fully and with relative ease, key words and cognates, as well as formulaic phrases across a range of highly contextualized texts. Where vocabulary has been learned, they can understand predictable language and messages such as those found on train schedules, roadmaps, and street signs. Readers at the Novice High sublevel are typically able to derive meaning from short, non-complex texts that convey basic information for which there is contextual or extralinguistic support.

 

Novice Mid

At the Novice Mid sublevel, readers are able to recognize the letters or symbols of an alphabetic or syllabic writing system or a limited number of characters in a character-based language. They can identify a number of highly contextualized words and phrases including cognates and borrowed words but rarely understand material that exceeds a single phrase. Rereading is often required.

 

Novice Low

At the Novice Low sublevel, readers are able to recognize a limited number of letters, symbols or characters. They are occasionally able to identify high-frequency words and/or phrases when strongly supported by context.

 

For additional information go to 

ACTFL PROFICIENCY GUIDELINES 2012

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Speakers at the Advanced level engage in conversation in a clearly participatory manner in order to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national, or international interest. The topics are handled concretely by means of narration and description in the major times frames of past, present, and future. These speakers can also deal with a social situation with an unexpected complication. The language of Advanced-level speakers is abundant, the oral paragraph being the measure of Advanced-level length and discourse. Advanced-level speakers have sufficient control of basic structures and generic vocabulary to be understood by native speakers of the language, including those unaccustomed to non-native speech.

Advanced High

Speakers at the Advanced High sublevel perform all Advanced-level tasks with linguistic ease, confidence, and competence. They are consistently able to explain in detail and narrate fully and accurately in all time frames. In addition, Advanced High speakers handle the tasks pertaining to the Superior level but cannot sustain performance at that level across a variety of topics. They may provide a structured argument to support their opinions, and they may construct hypotheses, but patterns of error appear. They can discuss some topics abstractly, especially those relating to their particular interests and special fields of expertise, but in general, they are more comfortable discussing a variety of topics concretely.

Advanced High speakers may demonstrate a well-developed ability to compensate for an imperfect grasp of some forms or for limitations in vocabulary by the confident use of communicative strategies, such as paraphrasing, circumlocution, and illustration. They use precise vocabulary and intonation to express meaning and often show great fluency and ease of speech. However, when called on to perform the complex tasks associated with the Superior level over a variety of topics, their language will at times break down or prove inadequate, or they may avoid the task altogether, for example, by resorting to simplification through the use of description or narration in place of argument or hypothesis.

Advanced Mid

Speakers at the Advanced Mid sublevel are able to handle with ease and confidence a large number of communicative tasks. They participate actively in most informal and some formal exchanges on a variety of concrete topics relating to work, school, home, and leisure activities, as well as topics relating to events of current, public, and personal interest or individual relevance.

Advanced Mid speakers demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames of past, present, and future by providing a full account, with good control of aspect. Narration and description tend to be combined and interwoven to relate relevant and supporting facts in connected, paragraph-length discourse.

Advanced Mid speakers can handle successfully and with relative ease the linguistic challenges presented by a complication or unexpected turn of events that occurs within the context of a routine situation or communicative task with which they are otherwise familiar. Communicative strategies such as circumlocution or rephrasing are often employed for this purpose. The speech of Advanced Mid speakers performing Advanced-level tasks is marked by substantial flow. Their vocabulary is fairly extensive although primarily generic in nature, except in the case of a particular area of specialization or interest. Their discourse may still reflect the oral paragraph structure of their own language rather than that of the target language.

Advanced Mid speakers contribute to conversations on a variety of familiar topics, dealt with concretely, with much accuracy, clarity and precision, and they convey their intended message without misrepresentation or confusion. They are readily understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives. When called on to perform functions or handle topics associated with the Superior level, the quality and/or quantity of their speech will generally decline.

Advanced Low

Speakers at the Advanced Low sublevel are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. They can also speak about some topics related to employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.

Advanced Low speakers demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in the major time frames of past, present, and future in paragraph-length discourse with some control of aspect. In these narrations and descriptions, Advanced Low speakers combine and link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length, although these narrations and descriptions tend to be handled separately rather than interwoven. They can handle appropriately the essential linguistic challenges presented by a complication or an unexpected turn of events.

Responses produced by Advanced Low speakers are typically not longer than a single paragraph. The speaker’s dominant language may be evident in the use of false cognates, literal translations, or the oral paragraph structure of that language. At times their discourse may be minimal for the level, marked by an irregular flow, and containing noticeable self-correction. More generally, the performance of Advanced Low speakers tends to be uneven.

Advanced Low speech is typically marked by a certain grammatical roughness (e.g., inconsistent control of verb endings), but the overall performance of the Advanced-level tasks is sustained, albeit minimally. The vocabulary of Advanced Low speakers often lacks specificity. Nevertheless, Advanced Low speakers are able to use communicative strategies such as rephrasing and circumlocution.

Advanced Low speakers contribute to the conversation with sufficient accuracy, clarity, and precision to convey their intended message without misrepresentation or confusion. Their speech can be understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives, even though this may require some repetition or restatement. When attempting to perform functions or handle topics associated with the Superior level, the linguistic quality and quantity of their speech will deteriorate significantly.

For additional information go to 

ACTFL PROFICIENCY GUIDELINES 2012

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Speakers at the Intermediate level are distinguished primarily by their ability to create with the language when talking about familiar topics related to their daily life. They are able to recombine learned material in order to express personal meaning. Intermediate level speakers can ask simple questions and can handle a straightforward survival situation. They produce sentence-level language, ranging from discrete sentences to strings of sentences, typically in present time. Intermediate-level speakers are understood by interlocutors who are accustomed to dealing with non-native learners of the language.

Intermediate High

Intermediate High speakers are able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with the routine tasks and social situations of the Intermediate level. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to their work, school, recreation, particular interests, and areas of competence.

Intermediate High speakers can handle a substantial number of tasks associated with the Advanced level, but they are unable to sustain performance of all of these tasks all of the time. Intermediate High speakers can narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length, but not all the time. Typically, when Intermediate High speakers attempt to perform Advanced-level tasks, their speech exhibits one or more features of breakdown, such as the failure to carry out fully the narration or description in the appropriate major time frame, an inability to maintain paragraph-length discourse, or a reduction in breadth and appropriateness of vocabulary.

Intermediate High speakers can generally be understood by native speakers unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives, although interference from another language may be evident (e.g., use of code-switching, false cognates, literal translations), and a pattern of gaps in communication may occur.

Intermediate Mid

Speakers at the Intermediate Mid sublevel are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Conversation is generally limited to those predictable and concrete exchanges necessary for survival in the target culture. These include personal information related to self, family, home, daily activities, interests and personal preferences, as well as physical and social needs, such as food, shopping, travel, and lodging.

Intermediate Mid speakers tend to function reactively, for example, by responding to direct questions or requests for information. However, they are capable of asking a variety of questions when necessary to obtain simple information to satisfy basic needs, such as directions, prices, and services. When called on to perform functions or handle topics at the Advanced level, they provide some information but have difficulty linking ideas, manipulating time and aspect, and using communicative strategies, such as circumlocution.

Intermediate Mid speakers are able to express personal meaning by creating with the language, in part by combining and recombining known elements and conversational input to produce responses typically consisting of sentences and strings of sentences. Their speech may contain pauses, reformulations, and self-corrections as they search for adequate vocabulary and appropriate language forms to express themselves. In spite of the limitations in their vocabulary and/or pronunciation and/or grammar and/or syntax, Intermediate Mid speakers are generally understood by sympathetic interlocutors accustomed to dealing with non-natives.

Overall, Intermediate Mid speakers are at ease when performing Intermediate-level tasks and do so with significant quantity and quality of Intermediate-level language.

Intermediate Low

Speakers at the Intermediate Low sublevel are able to handle successfully a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks by creating with the language in straightforward social situations. Conversation is restricted to some of the concrete exchanges and predictable topics necessary for survival in the target-language culture. These topics relate to basic personal information; for example, self and family, some daily activities and personal preferences, and some immediate needs, such as ordering food and making simple purchases. At the Intermediate Low sublevel, speakers are primarily reactive and struggle to answer direct questions or requests for information. They are also able to ask a few appropriate questions. Intermediate Low speakers manage to sustain the functions of the Intermediate level, although just barely.

Intermediate Low speakers express personal meaning by combining and recombining what they know and what they hear from their interlocutors into short statements and discrete sentences. Their responses are often filled with hesitancy and inaccuracies as they search for appropriate linguistic forms and vocabulary while attempting to give form to the message. Their speech is characterized by frequent pauses, ineffective reformulations and self-corrections. Their pronunciation, vocabulary, and syntax are strongly influenced by their first language. In spite of frequent misunderstandings that may require repetition or rephrasing, Intermediate Low speakers can generally be understood by sympathetic interlocutors, particularly by those accustomed to dealing with non-natives.

For additional information go to 

ACTFL PROFICIENCY GUIDELINES 2012

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Novice-level speakers can communicate short messages on highly predictable, everyday topics that affect them directly. They do so primarily through the use of isolated words and phrases that have been encountered, memorized, and recalled. Novice-level speakers may be difficult to understand even by the most sympathetic interlocutors accustomed to non-native speech.

Novice High

Speakers at the Novice High sublevel are able to handle a variety of tasks pertaining to the Intermediate level, but are unable to sustain performance at that level. They are able to manage successfully a number of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Conversation is restricted to a few of the predictable topics necessary for survival in the target language culture, such as basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities, preferences, and immediate needs. Novice High speakers respond to simple, direct questions or requests for information. They are also able to ask a few formulaic questions.

Novice High speakers are able to express personal meaning by relying heavily on learned phrases or recombinations of these and what they hear from their interlocutor. Their language consists primarily of short and sometimes incomplete sentences in the present, and may be hesitant or inaccurate. On the other hand, since their language often consists of expansions of learned material and stock phrases, they may sometimes sound surprisingly fluent and accurate. Pronunciation, vocabulary, and syntax may be strongly influenced by the first language. Frequent misunderstandings may arise but, with repetition or rephrasing, Novice High speakers can generally be understood by sympathetic interlocutors used to nonnatives. When called on to handle a variety of topics and perform functions pertaining to the Intermediate level, a Novice High speaker can sometimes respond in intelligible sentences, but will not be able to sustain sentence-level discourse.

Novice Mid

Speakers at the Novice Mid sublevel communicate minimally by using a number of isolated words and memorized phrases limited by the particular context in which the language has been learned. When responding to direct questions, they may say only two or three words at a time or give an occasional stock answer. They pause frequently as they search for simple vocabulary or attempt to recycle their own and their interlocutor’s words. Novice Mid speakers may be understood with difficulty even by sympathetic interlocutors accustomed to dealing with non-natives. When called on to handle topics and perform functions associated with the Intermediate level, they frequently resort to repetition, words from their native language, or silence.

Novice Low

Speakers at the Novice Low sublevel have no real functional ability and, because of their pronunciation, may be unintelligible. Given adequate time and familiar cues, they may be able to exchange greetings, give their identity, and name a number of familiar objects from their immediate environment. They are unable to perform functions or handle topics pertaining to the Intermediate level, and cannot therefore participate in a true conversational exchange.

For additional information go to 

ACTFL PROFICIENCY GUIDELINES 2012

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Writers at the Advanced level are characterized by the ability to write routine informal and some formal correspondence, as well as narratives, descriptions, and summaries of a factual nature. They can narrate and describe in the major time frames of past, present, and future, using paraphrasing and elaboration to provide clarity. Advanced-level writers produce connected discourse of paragraph length and structure. At this level, writers show good control of the most frequently used structures and generic vocabulary, allowing them to be understood by those unaccustomed to the writing of non-natives.

Advanced High

Writers at the Advanced High sublevel are able to write about a variety of topics with significant precision and detail. They can handle informal and formal correspondence according to appropriate conventions. They can write summaries and reports of a factual nature. They can also write extensively about topics relating to particular interests and special areas of competence, although their writing tends to emphasize the concrete aspects of such topics. Advanced High writers can narrate and describe in the major time frames, with solid control of aspect. In addition, they are able to demonstrate the ability to handle writing tasks associated with the Superior level, such as developing arguments and constructing hypotheses, but are not able to do this all of the time; they cannot produce Superior-level writing consistently across a variety of topics treated abstractly or generally. They have good control of a range of grammatical structures and a fairly wide general vocabulary. When writing at the Advanced level, they often show remarkable ease of expression, but under the demands of Superior-level writing tasks, patterns of error appear. The linguistic limitations of Advanced High writing may occasionally distract the native reader from the message.

Advanced Mid

Writers at the Advanced Mid sublevel are able to meet a range of work and/or academic writing needs. They demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe with detail in all major time frames with good control of aspect. They are able to write straightforward summaries on topics of general interest. Their writing exhibits a variety of cohesive devices in texts up to several paragraphs in length. There is good control of the most frequently used target-language syntactic structures and a range of general vocabulary. Most often, thoughts are expressed clearly and supported by some elaboration. This writing incorporates organizational features both of the target language and the writer’s first language and may at times resemble oral discourse. Writing at the Advanced Mid sublevel is understood readily by natives not used to the writing of nonnatives. When called on to perform functions or to treat issues at the Superior level, Advanced Mid writers will manifest a decline in the quality and/or quantity of their writing.

Advanced Low

Writers at the Advanced Low sublevel are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They demonstrate the ability to narrate and describe in major time frames with some control of aspect. They are able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. Advanced Low writers are able to combine and link sentences into texts of paragraph length and structure. Their writing, while adequate to satisfy the criteria of the Advanced level, may not be substantive. Writers at the Advanced Low sublevel demonstrate the ability to incorporate a limited number of cohesive devices, and may resort to some redundancy and awkward repetition. They rely on patterns of oral discourse and the writing style of their first language. These writers demonstrate minimal control of common structures and vocabulary associated with the Advanced level. Their writing is understood by natives not accustomed to the writing of non-natives, although some additional effort may be required in the reading of the text. When attempting to perform functions at the Superior level, their writing will deteriorate significantly.

For additional information go to 

ACTFL PROFICIENCY GUIDELINES 2012

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Subcategories

Arabic Language Program

The Cobb County Arabic program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-IV

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn Arabic?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning Arabic and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

Chinese Language Program

The Cobb County Chinese program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-V
  • AP Chinese Language and Culture

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn Chinese?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning Chinese and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

 

French Language Program

 LWL

Why should you learn French?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning French and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

The Cobb County French program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-VIII
  • AP Language & Culture

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

** Teacher Log-in is required to access some of the resources below:

Course
Profile
Proficiency
Targets
 Instructional
Resources

 

 
Click on the links below for additional resources
:

German Language Program

The Cobb County German program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-VI
  • AP German Language and Culture

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn German?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning German and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

 

 

** Teacher Log-in is required to access some of the resources below:

Course
Profile
Proficiency
Targets
 Instructional
Resources

 

Japanese Language Program

The Cobb County Japanese program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-V

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn Japanese?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning Japanese and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

 

 

Click on the links below for additional resources: (Coming soon)

  • Teacher Resources (log in required)
  • Student Textbook Resources 
  • Online resources

Latin Language Program

The Cobb County Latin program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-VI
  • AP Latin Language

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn Latin?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning Latin and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

 

 

Click on the links below for additional resources: (Coming soon)

  • Teacher Resources (log in required)
  • Student Textbook Resources 
  • Online resources

Portuguese Language Program

The Cobb County Portuguese program is currently offered at our Magnet School for International Studies at North Cobb High School. We offer the following courses:

  • Levels I-III

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn Portuguese?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning Portuguese and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

Spanish Language Program

The Cobb County Spanish program offers the following courses

  • Levels I - VIII
  • AP Language & Culture
  • AP Literature & Culture
  • Spanish for native speakers Levels I - II

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

** Teacher Log-in is required to access some of the resources below:

Course
Profile
Proficiency
Targets
 Instructional
Resources

 

LWL

Why should you learn Spanish?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning Spanish and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

 

 

 

 

American Sign Language Program

The Cobb County ASL program offers the following courses:

  • Levels I-IV

*Not all schools offer all the course levels or languages, please check with your local school for a list of current course offerings.

 

LWL

Why should you learn American Sign Language?

Visit the Lead with Languages site and learn more about the benefits of learning American Sign Language and other languages.

Click HERE to learn more about the languages offered at Cobb County Schools.

Cobb County Schools Dual Language Immersion Program

Interested in Dual Language Immersion being offered at your school?

Contact your school principal and let them know you are interested in the program. Click here for the list of Cobb Elementary schools and links to their websites.

 

What is Dual Language Immersion?

Dual Language Immersion is a way to learn academic content while acquiring another language at the same time. Starting the 2015-2016 academic year, Cobb County students have the opportunity to participate on the Dual Language Immersion Program (DLI). The goals of the program are for the students to develop literacy skills in both English and the target language  while attaining a high level of academic achievement that is at or above their grade level in all content areas and to develop a world cultural sensitivity.  Each school/community chooses the immersion language for its school.

 

What schools and grade levels are currently offering the DLI program?

Dual Language Immersion programs provide students with academic instruction in two languages. In addition to gaining grade level content area knowledge and skills, students develop higher levels of language competency.

The list below indicate the available biligual programs available in Cobb at the Elementary and High School levels.

 

Elementary Schools (K-5)

DLI programs at the elementary level will continue to grow one grade level at a time every school year as students move from Kindergarten through 5th grade. Please see the chart below for an list of current schools offering the Dual Immersion program, the language of the program, and the grade levels available for each academic year. 

 School Year 2018 - 2019

School  K 1st 2nd 3rd

WL Languages SpanishClarkdale ElementaryCardinal Clarkdale

       
WL Languages SpanishDowell Elementary Dowell ES        
WL Languages Spanish Fair Oaks ElementaryFairOaks ES        
WL Languages Spanish Hollydale ElementaryHollydale        

WL Languages Spanish Mableton ElementaryMableton Logo

       
WL Languages SpanishNickajack ElementaryNickajack ES
       
WL Languages Spanish Norton Park ElementaryNPES Eagle        
WL Languages Spanish Riverside Primary (K-1) RES horse        
WL Languages Spanish Riverside Intermediate (2-5)        

WL Languages Spanish Russell ElementaryRussell ES

       
WL Languages Spanish Smyrna Elementary smyrna header        

 

High Schools (9-12)

DLI programs at the high school level will continue to grow one grade level at a time every school year as students move from 9th through 12th grade. Please see the chart below for an list of current schools offering the Dual Immersion program, the language of the program, and the grade levels available for each academic year.

School  9th 10th 11th 12th

WL Languages Spanish Sprayberry High School - ISLASHS.Mascot Small

       
WL Languages Spanish Walton High School - ISAWalton Logo        

 

How does it look in the classroom?

Groups smallElementary: Instruction is divided between two high quality, creative classrooms: one English and one immersion (target language) with fifty percent of the academic day taught in English and fifty percent of the academic day taught in the target language. Students enjoy the advantage of two caring, highly qualified teachers. The English-speaking teacher uses half of the instructional day to teach English Language Arts, literacy, and content area support.  The immersion teacher uses the other half of the day to teach math, science, social studies, and target language literacy.Teachers are trained in the use of instructional strategies that promote languages learning and academic development.

 

What skills/content do the students learn in the DLI program?

Content area distribution

 

Students in the Dual Immersion Program learn the concepts and skills for the various subject areas at the same time that they develop the ability to read, write, speak, and listen in another 

language.  Students learn the same concepts and skills for the various subject areas as their grade level peers at the same time that they develop the ability to read, write, speak, and listen in another language. Students receive math, science, and social studies instruction in a target language, such as Spanish, French, or Chinese.  

 

What are the benefits of Dual Language Immersion?

Language Skills: Students achieve high proficiency in the immersion language.Immersion students become bilingual and biliterate.

Improved Performance on Standardized Tests: Immersion students perform as well as or better than non-immersion students on standardized tests of English and math administered in English.

Enhanced Cognitive Skills: Immersion students typically develop greater cognitive flexibility, demonstrating increased attention control, better memory, and superior problem solving skills as well as an enhanced understanding of their primary language.

Increased Cultural Sensitivity: Immersion students are more aware of and show more positive attitudes towards other cultures and an appreciation of other people.

Long Term Benefits: Immersion students are better prepared for the global community and job markets where a second language is an asset.a

sset.

 

Cobb County World Language Program courses are designed to assist the students' development of language and intercultural skills. Each course has set learning targets based on ACTFL's language proficiency standards and NCSSFL-ACTFL Can Do Statements. ACTFL standards goal areas are: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities.

Communication

This is the main area of the standards and in which we based a great part of our course program.  There are three modes within the communication standards, Interpersonal, Presentational, and Interpretive.  Use the links below to learn more about the language domains and sublevels for each mode.

MODES CCSD WL Modes Interpersonal Interpersonal CCSD WL Modes Presentational Presentational CCSD WL Modes Interpretive Interpretive
LEVELS CCSD WL SpeakingSpeaking CCSD WL WritingWriting CCSD WL ListeningListening CCSD WL ReadingReading
Novice CCSD WL Interpersonal NH 100px CCSD WL Speaking NH 100px CCSD WL Writing NH 100px CCSD WL Listening NH 100px CCSD WL Reading NH 100px
Intermediate CCSD WL Interpersonal IH 100px CCSD WL Speaking IH 100px CCSD WL Writing IH 100px CCSD WL Listening IH 100px CCSD WL Reading IH 100px
Advanced CCSD WL Interpersonal AH 100px CCSD WL Speaking AH 100px CCSD WL Writing AH 100px CCSD WL Listening AH 100px CCSD WL Reading AH 100px

Culture

The study of culture and language is strongly interconnected. Students use the language to investigate and interact properly with the practices, perspectives, and products of the various cultures. 

 LEVELS CCSD WL Interculturality Products PracticesProducts and Practices  CCSD WL Interculturality PerspectivesPerspectives  CCSD WL Interculturality InteractionsCultural Interaction 
Novice 
CCSD WL Interculturality Products Practices N 100px

CCSD WL Interculturality Perspectives N 100px

CCSD WL Interculturality Interactions N 100px
 Intermediate  CCSD WL Interculturality Products Practices I 100px  CCSD WL Interculturality Perspectives I 100px  CCSD WL Interculturality Interactions I 100px
 Advanced
CCSD WL Interculturality Products Practices A 100px
 CCSD WL Interculturality Perspectives A 100px  CCSD WL Interculturality Interactions A 100px

 

 

For more information and resources about language proficiency go to the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) at: https://www.actfl.org/